Proving the Business Case for the Internet of Things

LG opens AI research laboratory in Canada

Steve Rogerson
August 7, 2018



South Korean technology firm LG Electronics is opening an artificial intelligence (AI) laboratory in Canada and entering a research partnership with the University of Toronto.
 
The laboratory is an extension of the recently expanded LG Silicon Valley AI Lab in Santa Clara, California. Supporting LG's vision of AI as a key future growth engine, the North American labs enhance its global research capabilities, which include AI labs in South Korea, India and Russia.
 
In addition, LG is entering a research partnership with the University of Toronto, which is recognised worldwide for its AI and machine learning expertise, particularly in the area of deep learning.
 
"AI will ultimately touch everybody's lives, transforming the way we live, work and play," said LG Electronics president and chief technology officer IP Park (pictured right). "Early implementations of AI in connected devices today are setting the stage for tomorrow's smart cities, smart homes, smart businesses and smart devices, all with capabilities that no one has even dreamed of yet."
 
He said the North American labs and LG's research partnership with the University of Toronto would play a key role in developing source technologies defining that future.
 
Under its five-year, multi-million-dollar research partnership with the University of Toronto, LG will build on its open platform-open partnership-open connectivity strategy to expand the AI ecosystem. The lab will capitalise on the expertise of researchers at the University of Toronto who will now have the opportunity to work collaboratively with LG's growing US and Canadian AI R&D teams. Complementing this work, LG intends to collaborate with and invest in North American start-ups.
 
University of Toronto president Meric Gertler (pictured left) views LG as an exciting new partner for AI research.
 
"The University of Toronto looks forward to partnering with an innovative global company like LG as our researchers continue to advance the boundaries of artificial intelligence,” he said. “The presence of such leading, multi-national firms in our innovation ecosystem strengthens opportunities for our faculty, students and start-up companies across a whole range of disciplines."
 
Echoing Gertler's views, Park said: "AI based on deep learning will revolutionise how we interact with the world around us, in new seamless ways that use contextual data from things like biometrics, emotions, gestures and of course voice."
 
He went on to explain the three main pillars of LG's AI strategy.
 
“The first is the ability to evolve with time, so the more you use our products, the better they evolve to meet your specific needs,” he said. “The second is the ability to integrate AI into diverse touch points – to have a seamless, consistent user experience across the entire LG product portfolio, from connected appliances and TVs to connected cars and smartphones. The third is openness; our strategy is to provide the best AI experience for LG customers, leveraging the complementary capabilities of leading partners across the ecosystem."